Latest Tweets:

did-you-kno:

 Musical roads are also known to exist in: Denmark, South Korea, and the United States of America.
Source 1, 2 

did-you-kno:

 Musical roads are also known to exist in: Denmark, South Korea, and the United States of America.

Source 12 

modcloth:

A colorful cake for your next party. 

modcloth:

A colorful cake for your next party. 

modcloth:

Try it with our Take Your Turntable in Green or Blue. 

(Source: poppytalk.com)

purtie:

This has got to be one of the best things on this entire website

purtie:

This has got to be one of the best things on this entire website

(Source: rawrao, via sighingduck)

(Source: petitepluume, via sighingduck)

theniftyfifties:

A Minneapolis teenager photographed by Jerome Liebling, 1953.

theniftyfifties:

A Minneapolis teenager photographed by Jerome Liebling, 1953.

(Source: wehadfacesthen)

fordlibrarymuseum:

Happy Birthday, Betty Ford!
First Lady Betty Ford cuts her birthday cake prior to a performance of Hello, Dolly! at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC, on April 8, 1975.

fordlibrarymuseum:

Happy Birthday, Betty Ford!

First Lady Betty Ford cuts her birthday cake prior to a performance of Hello, Dolly! at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC, on April 8, 1975.

(Source: research.archives.gov, via ourpresidents)

usnatarchives:

Our own Archivist of the United States, David S. Ferriero, will introduce President Carter tonight at the Civil Rights Summit in Austin, Texas.

In honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library is hosting the summit on April 8, 9, and 10.

You can watch the panel discussions and keynote address live on their website: http://www.civilrightssummit.org/updates/

The keynote speakers include President Barack Obama and three former Presidents: Jimmy Carter will speak on April 8; Bill Clinton will speak on April 9; and George W. Bush will speak on the evening of April 10.

Learn more about the Civil Rights Act of 1964 in our new Google Cultural Institute exhibit, which includes videos, letters, telegrams, meeting minutes, and high resolution photos. 

Image: LBJ signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Serial Number: A1030-17a Date: 08/06/1965. Credit: LBJ Library photo by Yoichi Okamoto.

(via ourpresidents)

modcloth:

This look, inspired by The Grand Budapest Hotel, has us dreaming in saturated hues and shiny metallic details — just like Wes Anderson’s film. 

modcloth:

This look, inspired by The Grand Budapest Hotel, has us dreaming in saturated hues and shiny metallic details — just like Wes Anderson’s film. 

fashioninhistory:

Anna Karenina 
2012
Costumes by Jacqueline Durran
Worn by Keira Knightley
Each costume was created by Oscar winning costume designer Jacqueline Durran, for Keira Knightley's portrayal of Anna Karenina in the 2012 adaptation of the film directed by Joe Wright. The costumes are part of the 22nd annual Art of Motion Picture Costume Design exhibition currently being showcased at the FIDM Museum.
Back left dress: The bodice of Anna’s classic black ball gown was inspired by 1950s Balenciaga and Dior designs, while the full, taffeta skirt with elongated bustle reflects 19th-century lines.
Front Dress:  After Anna’s public divorce from Alexei (Jude Law), she attends an opera wearing a white dress that is the mirror image of the asymmetrical black gown she wore to an earlier ball.

fashioninhistory:

Anna Karenina

2012

Costumes by Jacqueline Durran

Worn by Keira Knightley

Each costume was created by Oscar winning costume designer Jacqueline Durran, for Keira Knightley's portrayal of Anna Karenina in the 2012 adaptation of the film directed by Joe Wright. The costumes are part of the 22nd annual Art of Motion Picture Costume Design exhibition currently being showcased at the FIDM Museum.

Back left dressThe bodice of Anna’s classic black ball gown was inspired by 1950s Balenciaga and Dior designs, while the full, taffeta skirt with elongated bustle reflects 19th-century lines.

Front Dress:  After Anna’s public divorce from Alexei (Jude Law), she attends an opera wearing a white dress that is the mirror image of the asymmetrical black gown she wore to an earlier ball.

fashioninhistory:

Necklace
René Jules Lalique
1897
René-Jules Lalique was born in the Marne region of France. As a young student he showed great artistic promise and his mother guided him toward jewelry making. From 1876 to 1878 he apprenticed with Louis Aucoc, a noted Parisian jeweler. By the 1890s he had opened his own workshop in Paris and become one of the most admired jewelers of the day.
Lalique avoided using precious stones and the conservatively classical settings favored by other leading jewelers of the time. Rather, he combined semiprecious stones with such materials as enamel, horn, ivory, coral, rock crystal, and irregularly shaped Baroque pearls in settings of organic inspiration, frequently accentuated by asymmetrical curves or elaborate flourishes.
He designed this powerfully evocative necklace for his second wife, Augustine-Alice Ledru, around the turn of the century. The repeats of the main motif — an attenuated female nude whose highly stylized curling hair swirls around her head and whose arms sensuously curve down to become a border enclosing enamel-and-gold swans and an oval cabochon amethyst — are separated by pendants set with fire opals mounted in swirling gold tendrils.

fashioninhistory:

Necklace

René Jules Lalique

1897

René-Jules Lalique was born in the Marne region of France. As a young student he showed great artistic promise and his mother guided him toward jewelry making. From 1876 to 1878 he apprenticed with Louis Aucoc, a noted Parisian jeweler. By the 1890s he had opened his own workshop in Paris and become one of the most admired jewelers of the day.

Lalique avoided using precious stones and the conservatively classical settings favored by other leading jewelers of the time. Rather, he combined semiprecious stones with such materials as enamel, horn, ivory, coral, rock crystal, and irregularly shaped Baroque pearls in settings of organic inspiration, frequently accentuated by asymmetrical curves or elaborate flourishes.

He designed this powerfully evocative necklace for his second wife, Augustine-Alice Ledru, around the turn of the century. The repeats of the main motif — an attenuated female nude whose highly stylized curling hair swirls around her head and whose arms sensuously curve down to become a border enclosing enamel-and-gold swans and an oval cabochon amethyst — are separated by pendants set with fire opals mounted in swirling gold tendrils.